Education becoming like fast food, parents want children to do everything at once

Next to it are skeletons of robots, which can fight each other in a sumo wrestling ring. Techies, who are not yet out of school, have created these.

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On a table is a lamp that can be operated from a mobile phone, using Wi-Fi. Next to it are skeletons of robots, which can fight each other in a sumo wrestling ring. Techies, who are not yet out of school, have created these. At Lydnow, an edutech start-up based out of Baner in Pune, students, aged between five and 22, are engrossed in playing with technology, from electronics to programming. As the company gets ready for the foundation summer courses, where new groups of students will be introduced to the magic of technology, Arijit Mallick, founder and director of training at Lydnow

Any technology begins its journey in some university with a PhD scholar doing some research and thinking of a brighter future. From there, it would take about 10 years for the technology to become mainstream, ie, adopted by people as part of their daily lives. For instance, 3D printing dates back to 1984 but it was only after 25 to 30 years that we could use it on our desktops. That was how it used to be. What has happened is that current future technologies in laboratories are no longer going to take 25 years to become mainstream.

For something to start becoming mainstream in three to five years is a drastic change. And so, mainstream education system needs to become equipped to adapt. They feel that students should have exposure to, knowledge of, and access to relevant skill sets in technologies that fit with present and future scenarios. Their curriculam in robotics, automation, 3D printing, drones, IoT (Internet of things) and machine learning aims at facilitating this journey for students.

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